Bukoto, Kampala, Uganda.

Bukoto, Kampala, Uganda.


Perhaps most worrying of all is the unwillingness of Obama and other Western leaders to say or do anything to support the hundreds of thousands of Muslim Ethiopians who have been demonstrating peacefully against government interference in their religious affairs for more than a year. (The Ethiopian government claims the country has a Christian majority, but Muslims may account for up to one half of the population.) You’d think a nonviolent Islamic movement would be just the kind of thing the Obama administration would want to showcase to the world. It has no hint of terrorist influence, and its leaders are calling for a secular government under the slogan “We have a cause worth dying for, but not worth killing for.” Indeed, the Ethiopian protesters may be leading Africa’s most promising and important nonviolent human rights campaign since the anti-apartheid struggle.

Source: New York Times Book Review Blog, “Obama: Failing the African Spring?”

Perhaps most worrying of all is the unwillingness of Obama and other Western leaders to say or do anything to support the hundreds of thousands of Muslim Ethiopians who have been demonstrating peacefully against government interference in their religious affairs for more than a year. (The Ethiopian government claims the country has a Christian majority, but Muslims may account for up to one half of the population.) You’d think a nonviolent Islamic movement would be just the kind of thing the Obama administration would want to showcase to the world. It has no hint of terrorist influence, and its leaders are calling for a secular government under the slogan “We have a cause worth dying for, but not worth killing for.” Indeed, the Ethiopian protesters may be leading Africa’s most promising and important nonviolent human rights campaign since the anti-apartheid struggle.

Source: New York Times Book Review Blog, “Obama: Failing the African Spring?”


More troubling times for the Democratic Republic of Congo…

The rebels, called the M23, are a heavily armed paradox. On one hand, they are ruthless, as documented by human rights groups. On the other hand they are able administrators — seemingly far better than the Congolese government, evidenced by a visit in recent days to their stronghold, Rutshuru.
Here, government police are gathered before being transported for new training, which is regarded by the M23 a reprogramming.

Source: NY Times, “Congo Slips Into Chaos Again as Rebels Gain,” by Jeffrey Gettleman. Photo by Jehad Nga.

More troubling times for the Democratic Republic of Congo…

The rebels, called the M23, are a heavily armed paradox. On one hand, they are ruthless, as documented by human rights groups. On the other hand they are able administrators — seemingly far better than the Congolese government, evidenced by a visit in recent days to their stronghold, Rutshuru.

Here, government police are gathered before being transported for new training, which is regarded by the M23 a reprogramming.

Source: NY Times, “Congo Slips Into Chaos Again as Rebels Gain,” by Jeffrey Gettleman. Photo by Jehad Nga.

Blakkah ft. Byaxy Killa - MoMoney - Uganda

Blakkah is a friend of mine from Kampala. Check out his new video.

Rohingya - The Forgotten People

They are branded as one of the most persecuted communities in the world by the UN, yet nobody knows their name. They are the forgotten people.

In recent weeks, the escalating violence has displaced more than 90,000 Rohingya people. Villages are being burnt, people are being abducted, concentration camps are being created, women are being raped and children mercilessly killed. The persecution against the Rohingya can be described in no other terms but that of ethnic cleansing and genocide.

I wonder when I’ll be able to stop comparing YouTube videos advocating crucially important causes to the Kony 2012 video by Invisible Children that went viral earlier this year.

No, no, this one surely won’t do—it’s lack of self-congratulatory, white-savior sentimentality will surely doom it to obscurity.

Over 92 million views on a 30 MINUTE VIDEO about a conflict in northern Uganda that has been going on for close to three decades. I remain completely amazed that they managed to pull that off. However, I feel the same way now as I felt when the video first came out, which is—what exactly has changed? 92 million people have now watched that video, but what tangible change has come to northern Uganda because of it? And if 92 million people still don’t care enough, who ever will?

Source: WeAreHelp.org. Visit the site for information about what you can do for the Rohingya.

To be openly gay in Uganda is to risk imprisonment and death, yet brave men like David Katos, the country’s first openly gay activist, have fought back. This heartbreaking and stirring documentary takes us inside this life and death struggle for human rights.

typicalugandan:

Gulu, Uganda
Photography by   magda rakita

typicalugandan:

Gulu, Uganda

Photography by magda rakita

The Nomads of Karamoja Uganda Photography by Jonathan Hyams

37thstate:

(Source: 37thstate)

"The White Savior Industrial Complex" by Teju Cole →


Shoebill, Uganda

Obviously the photographer interrupted his scheming to destroy the world.

Shoebill, Uganda

Obviously the photographer interrupted his scheming to destroy the world.

Baffling Illness Strikes Africa, Turns Children Into Mindless "Zombies" →

Source: Daily Tech

explorologee:

Virunga Volcanoes - Uganda

explorologee:

Virunga Volcanoes - Uganda

typicalugandan:

A funny spoof about how most Ugandan Members of Parliament act when interviewed by the press by MinibuzzUganda.

Pretty spot on.